Posts Tagged ‘East London’

Bangladesh 1971 and a lecture by Stuart Hall: forthcoming events at Rivington Place

May 6, 2008

Rivington Place is a new cultural centre in East London, dedicated ‘to the education of the public in culturally diverse visual arts and photography in the UK’. Astonishingly, it is apparently the first new-build public gallery in London since the Hayward Gallery opened in 1968, which perhaps give some indication of the huge mountain any cultural organisation – community archives included – have to climb to acquire any sort of permanent space. (I can’t help thinking the Rich Mix Cultural Foundation just up the road might beg to differ, but I guess it’s not really a gallery…).

I was alerted to its first serious of events on the theme of Bangladesh 1971 by the Swahidnata Trust whose Bengali Oral History project took the memories of the War of Independence as one of its key themes. Thanks for the link!

For me the highlight of the season will be Stuart Hall’s contribution to the panel discussion on May 21st: ‘The Missing Chapter – Cultural Identity and the Photographic Archive‘. Here’s the text from the website:

To mark their 20th anniversary, Autograph ABP presents the first in a series of public events to celebrate the development of the Archive and Research Centre for Culturally Diverse Photography at Rivington Place.

With the support of a major Heritage Lottery Fund grant, Autograph ABP is developing the UK’s first permanent public print collection and digital resource dedicated to culturally diverse photographic practice – a long overdue project with the potential to transform the way Britain’s cultural history is represented.

Renée Mussai, Archive Project Manager, will chair the discussion with Stuart Hall, Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the Open University; Mark Sealy, Director of Autograph ABP; and artists Joy Gregory and Roshini Kempadoo.

Opportunities to hear Stuart Hall speak are rare these days, especially on the topic of cultural heritage, about which he has in the past proved so insightful and inspirational. It doesn’t look from the website like you have to book – but I suggest you turn up well in advance.

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